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Tuesday, March 21, 2017

UPDATE: BRYANNA'S NEW, EASY PALM OIL-FREE VEGAN BUTTER-Y SPREAD (SOY AND NON-SOY VERSIONS)

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The new soy version, refrigerated

Please read this post http://veganfeastkitchen.blogspot.ca/2017/03/new-easy-cheap-palm-oil-free-vegan.html, which explains why I've been messin' around with this recipe.

The new soy version on the left, and the new non-soy version on the right, frozen so that you can just scrape some of the spread off the top.

BRYANNA'S NEW, EASY PALM OIL-FREE VEGAN BUTTER-Y SPREAD (Soy & Non-Soy versions)
Servings: 24 tablespoons
Yield: 1 1/2 cups
This is an inexpensive, delicious and easy-to-make butter-y spread to use on bread, toast, muffins, etc., in sauces on and cooked vegetables.  It may not be firm enough to use in place of butter or solid margarine in some baking-- though it may work if it was frozen first and used quickly.  I have added just a small amount of coconut oil so that it firms up. (Refrigerated, the non-soy version is softer than the soy version, but not runny. Refrigerated, the soy version is similar to a tub margarine in consistency. Frozen, both are firm and can be scraped with a knife to use on toast, etc.)

New Soy version, refrigerated
NON-SOY VARIATION:
Instead of soymilk, use Silk or So Delicious Coconut Creamer (Original), which are both cruelty-free, or you can use a creamy sort of plant-based milk. (Rice milk is too thin). Use 3/4 tsp. guar gum and 1 Tbsp. sunflower lecithin in the non-soy version.
NOTE: Silk and So Delicious use cruelty-free coconut products: See http://mykindcloset.com/2015/09/21/is-your-coconut-oil-a-product-of-animal-cruelty/
Non-soy version, frozen.

1/2 cup soy milk (I used Silk Organic Original-- have not tried it with homemade soy milk yet)
1/2 Tbs soy or sunflower lecithin
3/4 cup neutral tasting oil
1/4 cup cruelty-free coconut oil (see brands here), melted but not hot.
1/2 tsp lemon juice
1/2 tsp fine sea salt
1/4 tsp guar gum or xanthan gum

Pour the soy milk  and the lecithin into the blender container and place the cover on it, with the central cap off.  Turn on to Low speed and pour a thin stream of a mixture of the two oils slowly into the milk until all of it is used up.  Still blending, add the lemon juice, salt, and guar or xanthan gum. Increase the speed of the blender to High. Blend for a short time, just until it thickens to the consistency of a very thick mayonnaise.


Use a small silicone spatula to scoop the mixture into a shallow glass refrigerator container or a butter dish.  Scrape as much of it out of the blender container as you can. Smooth the top.  Cover and refrigerate for several hours before using. You can also freeze it, or freeze it until the mixture is firm and then refrigerate.

Nutrition Facts (Serving size: 1/24 of a recipe/0.5 ounces/1 tablespoon.)
Calories 84.17, Calories From Fat (100%) 84.04, Total Fat 9.45g, Saturated Fat 2.5g, Monounsaturated Fat 4.2g, Polyunsaturated Fat 2.24g, Trans Fatty Acids 0g , Cholesterol 0mg, Sodium 41.29mg, Potassium 7.01mg, Total Carbohydrates 0.2g, Fiber 0.07g, Sugar 0.13g, Protein 0.15g , Vitamin A 0.02IU, MyPoints 2.46 

TIPS:
See this article for a list of cruelty-free brands of coconut products and other products that contain coconut oil: http://mykindcloset.com/2015/09/21/is-your-coconut-oil-a-product-of-animal-cruelty/
Published earlier this month, the most comprehensive article I read, Pay Coconuts, Get Monkeys,  gives us an idea  of what life is like for these monkeys, how valuable they are economically, and how legal loopholes enable trainers and “zoos” to essentially get away with animal abuse and neglect.

Early on in the piece a man called Noi Petchpradab, who has been training macaques to harvest coconuts for thirty years, was interviewed and discusses daily life for these working monkeys: "When they are not working, the animals are chained to tree stumps, which Mr. Noi said is due to their aggressiveness. They are given three daily meals, consisting of rice mixed with Lactasoy milk."

The article also goes on to say:
"Due to their ability to work for long hours, the macaques are capable of collecting 600-1,000 coconuts per day, compared to only 100-200 for humans. On a few occasions, he admitted, the monkeys are so tired they faint.
This practice will surely continue as long as there is both a market for coconut oil and consumers who are ignorant to the fact that this is even happening. Also, there will always be an economic incentive for people in these areas to use monkeys as performers as long as tourists are willing to spend money to visit them."


Sincerely,



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